Step 3 - Implementation

Once objectives have been agreed, structures have been put in place and data collected, it is time to decide on which EEMs (Energy Efficiency Measures) to implement. It is vital to consider and compare all potential EEMs to ensure that those with the greatest financial and non-financial benefits to the business are realized at minimum cost (including indirect cost such as business disruption, unanticipated maintenance, etc.). Only then should a business case be established for the selected EEMs, maximizing the likelihood that they will be approved by senior management. The implementation stage concludes with consideration of how to procure and implement an EEM.

Link to ISO 50001

An organization with an ISO 50001 certified Energy Management System must use technological or procedural controls to reduce its energy use. Training, control of documentation and communication are all key elements of ISO 50001 certification that are not specifically referenced in this toolkit.

Evaluate EEMs...

Evaluate EEMs

What?

There are a wide variety of EEMs (Energy Efficiency Measures) that an organization can implement to reduce the energy usage of its buildings. These range from simple measures, such as replacing existing lighting with LED or high efficiency alternatives, to more involved measures, such as replacing motors and drives with variable speed systems, to deep energy retrofits.


Related Case Studies



Related Tools & Resources

Why?

A financial evaluation of common EEMs using the data collected in the baselining and energy audit exercises helps reveal which EEMs should be appropriate, and which of these are likely to be the most inexpensive and straightforward to implement. Low cost and low risk EEMs can sometimes be implemented using an operating budget rather than seeking financial and management approval for additional capital expenditure.

An ideal EEM will have low upfront cost, low complexity (easy to install, operate, maintain, etc.), a quick return on investment (i.e. by delivering energy savings that quickly cover upfront cost) and be appropriate to the building and/or organization-wide energy efficiency strategy.


How?

Assigning an Opportunity Class Index provides a good starting point for assessing which EEMs might have the strongest business case and which ones can be ruled out. Potential EEMs will then likely require further and more detailed financial evaluation (particularly for higher cost and complexity EEMs).

Whatever approach is chosen, the process used to assess potential EEMs needs to be fully documented, should involve the review of data, and benefit from input from the whole energy team (and potentially further input from outside of the team).

A good rule of thumb is to prioritize EEMs that have a payback of 4 years or less. These can be considered and assigned as ‘opportunities for implementation’ or ‘opportunities for further investigation’, and prioritized based on how well they are aligned with the organizational and building energy efficiency strategy.

Energy efficiency projects can consist of single EEMs or a bundle of EEMs combined to generate a better return on investment. The combined approach may enable the implementation of EEMs with longer payback periods whilst still generating some short term savings. However, in many cases, a decision about one EEM will directly affect the impact of others, so it is vital to take a holistic view.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What?

There are a wide variety of EEMs (Energy Efficiency Measures) that an organization can implement to reduce the energy usage of its buildings. These range from simple measures, such as replacing existing lighting with LED or high efficiency alternatives, to more involved measures, such as replacing motors and drives with variable speed systems, to deep energy retrofits.


Why?

A financial evaluation of common EEMs using the data collected in the baselining and energy audit exercises helps reveal which EEMs should be appropriate, and which of these are likely to be the most inexpensive and straightforward to implement. Low cost and low risk EEMs can sometimes be implemented using an operating budget rather than seeking financial and management approval for additional capital expenditure.

An ideal EEM will have low upfront cost, low complexity (easy to install, operate, maintain, etc.), a quick return on investment (i.e. by delivering energy savings that quickly cover upfront cost) and be appropriate to the building and/or organization-wide energy efficiency strategy.


How?

Assigning an Opportunity Class Index provides a good starting point for assessing which EEMs might have the strongest business case and which ones can be ruled out. Potential EEMs will then likely require further and more detailed financial evaluation (particularly for higher cost and complexity EEMs).

Whatever approach is chosen, the process used to assess potential EEMs needs to be fully documented, should involve the review of data, and benefit from input from the whole energy team (and potentially further input from outside of the team).

A good rule of thumb is to prioritize EEMs that have a payback of 4 years or less. These can be considered and assigned as ‘opportunities for implementation’ or ‘opportunities for further investigation’, and prioritized based on how well they are aligned with the organizational and building energy efficiency strategy.

Energy efficiency projects can consist of single EEMs or a bundle of EEMs combined to generate a better return on investment. The combined approach may enable the implementation of EEMs with longer payback periods whilst still generating some short term savings. However, in many cases, a decision about one EEM will directly affect the impact of others, so it is vital to take a holistic view.


Related Case Studies

Related Tools & Resources